Publication update 17: Kenyirus sheema – a new land snail species from an old rainforest


Holotype of the new species Kenyirus sheema. Foon, Tan and Clements, 2015.

The Belum-Temengor Rainforest Complex (BTFC) in the State of Perak covers a cross section of Peninsular Malaysia’s terrestrial ecosystems from lowland rainforests at the foothills to tropical montane cloud forests in the highlands. This 300 sq km of wilderness is home to healthy populations of mammalian megafauna including the critically endangered Malayan Tiger, Panthera tigris jacksoni. In fact, the remarkable state of ecosystem preservation in BTFC makes it one of the most critical regions in Peninsular Malaysia for the conservation of almost every group of rainforest flora and fauna. However, it was a cherry-sized snail that particularly caught the attention of Reuben, during one of his routine mammal surveys in BTFC one morning in February 2009. Read the rest of this entry

Video update 5: Project Pteropus takes flight

Did you know that International Bat Night is taking place in a week’s time??? Sadly, the Asia-Pacific region isn’t participating, and Malaysia won’t be holding any bat-related activities for that (a situation that we need to change!).

However, we felt that in conjunction with this, it is particularly fitting for Rimba to release the official Project Pteropus video! Sheema publicly unveiled this video during her presentation at the 3rd Southeast Asian Bat Conference (SEABCO2015) in Kuching this month.

This video highlights our work on fruit bats, and also aims to spread awareness on the importance of flying foxes and why we should conserve them. We hope to come out with a shorter, more general version soon, and in different Southeast Asian languages too!

Share away and help to spread the message!

Press Release: Mysterious black leopards finally reveal their spots

Leopards, found from the frozen forests of Russia to the scorching sands of the Kalahari Desert, are the most widely distributed large cat on earth. Their iconic spotted coat has been admired and coveted by humans for millennia. However, in just one region in their vast range, mysteriously the leopards are almost all entirely “black” or melanistic – the Malay Peninsula. This dark colouration sometimes hides the spotted pattern which all leopards have; the spots just don’t stand out clearly in melanistic individuals.


“This is a completely unique phenomenon for leopards, and represents perhaps the only known example of a mammal with almost an entire population completely composed of the melanistic form of the species” says Laurie Hedges, lead author of a study who just published a population density estimate on these animals in the Journal of Wildlife Management.

Melanism is a trait which can be found across many mammal species, and especially in big felids. Though theories, ranging from the explosion of Mount Toba in Sumatra to competition with tigers, have been put forward to explain how this unique melanistic population has come about, scientists are still puzzled…

Read the rest of this entry


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